A Landscape in Motion

Islands colliding with continents. Land rising up and mountains falling down. Volcanoes erupting through glaciers. Over 250 million years these processes created the unique landscapes of British Columbia’s Fire & Ice Aspiring Geopark. But it’s far from over—come see for yourself!

DISCOVER A HISTORY

250 MILLION YEARS IN THE MAKING

The Fire & Ice Geopark will eventually contain some 70 geosites stretching from the park’s southern boundary at Porteau Cove in Howe Sound, the location of a towering submarine moraine, 175 km north to Canada’s most active volcano, Mt. Meager, in the upper Lillooet Valley.

FEATURED GEOSITES

CHEAKAMUS BASALT ESKERS

The quarried and unquarried remnants of various subglacial, subaerial and ice-bounded lava flows.

BLACK TUSK

This ancient volcano was once capped with glacial ice but after erupting, the piping hot magma melted much of the ice and exposed the magnificent basalt chamber that we see today.

The Barrier & Garibaldi Lake

Garibaldi Lake in Garibaldi Provincial Park is a stunning, glacier-fed lake that sits 1,450 m high, surrounded by snow-capped mountains, glaciers, alpine meadows and volcanic structures.

LOGGER'S LAKE/VOLCANO

Logger’s Lake is a popular recreational destination occupying what appears to be the crater of a small volcano. Lava flowing from this volcano also formed the nearby lava escarpment known as Vulcan’s Scrapyard.

STAWAMUS CHIEF

The Stawamus Chief is a granitic dome It towers over 700 m (2,297 ft) above the waters of nearby Howe Sound. It is one of the largest granite monoliths in the world.

VULCAN'S SCRAPYARD

A half-kilometre-long escarpment of columnar dacite representing the terminus of a lava flow from the putative Logger’s Lake Volcano.

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GEOTHERMAL ENERGY